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Gillian Sanger

What advice would you give to your younger self? And what advice would your future self give to the current 'you'?

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Some of the most profound guided visualizations that I've experienced (both as a student and as a facilitator) are ones that have brought me or those I've led into contact with my/their younger self (whether child, teen, or younger adult).

So, I'd like to pose the question: What advice would you give to your younger self? And what advice would your future self give to the current 'you'?

In this moment, I'm laughing to myself as I realize the advice that is arising in response to both questions is the same 😄 and that is to trust. To trust that things will play out as they're meant to. To trust that I'll receive the support I need (both from within myself and from the outer world). And to trust that things will be okay. The anxious mind really gets wrapped up in the worst-case-scenario, and while I'm so glad that I've developed a more compassionate, clear understanding of anxiety, I still become caught up in worry from time to time.

This is a great check in - and reminder - for myself. To just breathe and lean into trust that everything is perfectly okay.

What is your response to these question?

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For my former self:

Take the time to discover what is MOST IMPORTANT to me.

What is at the root of my soul?

What experiences have touched that? 

How do I want to contribute to the world?

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To my younger self:  Understand that there are several points of views and experiences that shape those points of view and then invite a conversation that shares this information.

From my future self:  Don't grow up.

 

Edited by Michael
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9 hours ago, Michael said:

Understand that there are several points of views and experiences that shape those points of view and then invite a conversation that shares this information.

Very wise, and something that most of aren't taught. It's quite empowering when we come into this realization on a deep level!

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Not so profound probably, but for both cases: "go take a walk."

In my youth I was a real hot head, it wasn't until I was an adult that I learned  to walk off my immediate reactions to things. 

My future self would likely remind me to go take a walk. Except now the walk is a way to invigorate my childhood curiosity in nature, sights and sounds. 

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