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Gillian Sanger

Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness

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Hey everyone... I just got so much out of reading through your thoughtful questions and responses. Thank you for all of it. Truly.

 

i wanted to share something tnat I think would be of great interest to those of you here on this thread.  I’ve registered and think this resource can offer so much to us.  It is a free trauma skills summit given by Sounds True, and the link is below.

 

https://product.soundstrue.com/trauma-skills-summit/register/?_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJyYWNoZWwucG90dHMyN0B5YWhvby5jb20iLCAia2xfY29tcGFueV9pZCI6ICJKTURnYXEifQ%3D%3D

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4 hours ago, Rachel said:

i wanted to share something tnat I think would be of great interest to those of you here on this thread.  I’ve registered and think this resource can offer so much to us.  It is a free trauma skills summit given by Sounds True, and the link is below.

 

https://product.soundstrue.com/trauma-skills-summit/register/?_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJyYWNoZWwucG90dHMyN0B5YWhvby5jb20iLCAia2xfY29tcGFueV9pZCI6ICJKTURnYXEifQ%3D%3D

Thank you so much for sharing! I will add this to the calendar.

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For anyone here who is in the Mindfulness Meditation Teacher Training Program, did you join the call with David Treleaven about trauma-sensitive mindfulness? I watched the replay and it was a really great talk with really wonderful questions asked.

I really loved the exercises he offered using movement in the hands, as well as his shedding light on the fact that one doesn't need to be fully, 100% recovered from their own trauma in order to support others. He also highlighted the importance of curiosity in getting to know what someone is ready for, which I think is important because we can never know for certain right from the start. I'd love to hear what others drew from this discussion.

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This is a comment based on my experience in what I thought was the safest kind of training:  one on parenting techniques. It was a structured programs with modules to learn about communication and some group sharing of ideas that worked and those that didn't. For 90 % of this small discussion (not therapy) group things went well. I had not pre-screened clients. Big mistake! Unbeknownst to me, one member had bipolar disorder under control with medication and physician management. There was no topic that was appeared to be upsetting to that person. Nor did that person report distress. However, after about the 4th session she had to be hospitalized for a bipolar episode. Her family thought that just being in the group was too stressful though she never reported that to me or any member. That taught me the importance of some kind of pre-screening; an interview or background application that asks about past difficulties, trauma and history of treatment. I don't intend to teach mediatation, but if I did, pre-screening would be the first thing I did. Individual teaching or teaching done after consultation with a therapist seeing the potential mediatator is something I would use. These are only my ideas. I respect all other opinions. Daniel

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@Daniel A. Detwiler, thank you so much for sharing that anecdote.  Sean suggested to. me that it is always a good idea (and it was in Treleaven's book as well) to prescreen a new group- not necessarily for trauma, but just as a baseline of experience and hopes and expectations for practicing mindfulness.  I think it is a sound idea for all. 

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What a lovely thread to look back on! Thanks to all who contributed here last summer.

I just wanted to share a few clips that came out of David Treleaven's workshop in the Mindfulness Teacher Training Program quite a few months ago:

Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness Practice with David Treleaven - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuuLeN7MXFQ

The Spectrum of Trauma - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vlHpah_xcg

The Four Rs of Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZlTvoEjgpw

 

 

 

 

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So many Healthy discussions here; now I know these were posted in 2020; we have a Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness Book Club for those interested; feel free to join us with suggested discussions based on David Treleaven's Book, Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness; have any of you acquired it and /or read it?

Anyway feel free to join our club...all topics related welcome....

"FinestCoaching is all about Connecting the Dots".

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