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Ro H.

Optimized my environment to maximize mindfulness

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So I guess my mother was right - a cluttered space makes for a cluttered mind. 😄

I'm really starting to understand minimalism in the home - which is hard for a maximalist (decor) like me to come to terms with! But in those spaces of my home that I tend to use for practicing mindfulness less helps me to be more. 

Saying goodbye to clutter in my bedroom really helps with my evening practices so I can more easily drift off to sleep.

Edited by Ro H.
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@Ro H. - Okay first, I had no idea maximalist was a word! Now I know 🙂

Also, all of what you said rings true. For me, creating daily 'to-do' lists helps to settle/organize my mind. Otherwise, I find it difficult to turn thoughts into action. 

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Oh my.  I use to have little notes all over the place.  Lists of what to do in each room.  Especially the kitchen.  With kids around,  teenagers I find lists are needed.  Now I just do one room at a time and take my time.  Lord, I would even have dust the base boards.  I was a perfectionist.  Bedrooms would look like hotel rooms.   A Bed, Dresser and Chair is all the was there.  Crazy when I think back.  Now is not as bad.  Back then I would take a clothes basket to each room.  Put everything in it that belonged to a different room and empty as I went.  Not anymore.  Nameste

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On 2/15/2020 at 11:50 PM, Paige PIlege said:

Oh my.  I use to have little notes all over the place.  Lists of what to do in each room.  Especially the kitchen.  With kids around,  teenagers I find lists are needed.  Now I just do one room at a time and take my time.  Lord, I would even have dust the base boards.  I was a perfectionist.  Bedrooms would look like hotel rooms.   A Bed, Dresser and Chair is all the was there.  Crazy when I think back.  Now is not as bad.  Back then I would take a clothes basket to each room.  Put everything in it that belonged to a different room and empty as I went.  Not anymore.  Nameste

This resonates - my mother was that way so of course the minute I moved away from home I had stuff everywhere, just because I could. Fast forward decades later and I'm happy and content with whatever my space ends up transforming to. I do enjoy less in my calm zones, but I also enjoy lots of stuff in my creative spaces!  🙂

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On 2/22/2020 at 2:32 PM, Ro H. said:

This resonates - my mother was that way so of course the minute I moved away from home I had stuff everywhere, just because I could. Fast forward decades later and I'm happy and content with whatever my space ends up transforming to. I do enjoy less in my calm zones, but I also enjoy lots of stuff in my creative spaces!  🙂

@Ro H.I agree, I also like my things left out and where I put them in my creative spaces.  My whole house sometimes. lol.  Actually I like having the clean part where people enter and sit.  The rest of the house is so so. lol.  I was a perfectionist and everything in its place.  Then the more I moved it I forget where I put it.  Too many junk drawers.  I am like you I like to be creative.   Do you end up with a lot of junk drawers?  I don't know where it all comes from. 

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I have ADHD and creating structure is so difficult for me. I prefer to have structure built into my day. But, during this pandemic I had to find a way. So, I grabbed my white board and hung it on the living room wall and grabbed post-it notes and wrote tasks on them (things I would like/need to do in addition to the daily activities I normally do) and placed them on the white board. Each day, I grab a post-it note from the board and do it. If I do more than one - great. But, it is helping me not be so overwhelmed with all of the "to do" items that I literally can just put off for another day. I am getting shit done! And, at the same time, I am resting and spending time practicing more and just being present with all that is here - the chaos, uncertainty, compassion, gratitude, loneliness, suffering, constant change, aversion, desire, etc. So, I am allowing myself much more grace than I normally do. After all, I have never been through a pandemic before and none of us have, so we are all doing the best we can, right?

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8 hours ago, Mindfulness With Robyn said:

After all, I have never been through a pandemic before and none of us have, so we are all doing the best we can, right?

Absolutely! This is new territory, and I love how you are navigating and balancing opposing needs for rest and productivity. I have a virtual post-it note board on Trello.com. A great free online resources for organizing tasks!

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On 4/21/2020 at 4:33 PM, Mindfulness With Robyn said:

I have ADHD and creating structure is so difficult for me. I prefer to have structure built into my day. But, during this pandemic I had to find a way. So, I grabbed my white board and hung it on the living room wall and grabbed post-it notes and wrote tasks on them (things I would like/need to do in addition to the daily activities I normally do) and placed them on the white board. Each day, I grab a post-it note from the board and do it. If I do more than one - great. But, it is helping me not be so overwhelmed with all of the "to do" items that I literally can just put off for another day. I am getting shit done! 

@Mindfulness With Robyn thank you for this share! you've actually inspired me to do  something similar since I've just come across a fresh pack of post-its in one of my junk drawers 😆 Like @Gillian Sanger I usually prefer online options, like Trello (I actually use Realtimeboard, a web based white board), but with all the benefits of online organization comes the downside -- my avoidance tendencies -- they're so easy to completely ignore or forget about. I think your post-it solution is exactly what I need to keep my focused on what I actually would like to accomplish short term. 

Congrats on knocking out those post-its each day, Robyn! I'm applauding you from California 🙂

 

On 4/21/2020 at 4:11 PM, Paige PIlege said:

@Ro H.I agree, I also like my things left out and where I put them in my creative spaces.  My whole house sometimes. lol.  Actually I like having the clean part where people enter and sit.  The rest of the house is so so. lol.  I was a perfectionist and everything in its place.  Then the more I moved it I forget where I put it.  Too many junk drawers.  I am like you I like to be creative.   Do you end up with a lot of junk drawers?  I don't know where it all comes from. 

Absolutely! I didn't realize it (out of sight, out of mind) but just like @Mindfulness With Robyn I've been using this time to approach a list and as I started spring cleaning I realized I have several junk drawers!  Actually, junk cabinets, too! It's a happy-accident though because I'm finding tons of unused art supplies and now is the perfect time to start putting them to use again to help me calm my mind (something I've been struggling with while I self isolate in a big city).  

@Paige PIlege have you found anything long forgotten that you might have use for again (like I did with my forgotten art supplies), or mostly things you'll let go?  I'm noticing a lot of people are using this time to embrace minimalism, too - so I'm curious about your experience. 🙂

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I still haven't figured out this medium for replying to others' comments. @Ro H. I have too many junk drawers too! So, I added a section to my white board that contains the post-it notes, at the bottom - tasks I can do daily (ex: clean out a drawer/cabinet, Organize a file, Delete files on computer, etc). That is, if I get around to it. Having it there as a reminder (as opposed to in my head) helps. I have checkboxes for them for each day of the week. I should take a pic and post it. Maybe tomorrow. Ha-Ha. LOL!

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