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Sean Fargo

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Posts posted by Sean Fargo

  1. Great idea, Tribal! We all need self-compassion. 🙂

    Here are some free self-compassion resources here at Mindfulness Exercises:

    https://mindfulnessexercises.com/free-self-compassion-exercises/

     

    I also appreciate what Kristin Neff states:

     

    Quote

     

    Self-Compassion is not self-pity.

    When individuals feel self-pity, they become immersed in their own problems and forget that others have similar problems.  They ignore their interconnections with others, and instead feel that they are the only ones in the world who are suffering. Self-pity tends to emphasize egocentric feelings of separation from others and exaggerate the extent of personal suffering. Self-compassion, on the other hand, allows one to see the related experiences of self and other without these feelings of isolation and disconnection. Also, self-pitying individuals often become carried away with and wrapped up in their own emotional drama. They cannot step back from their situation and adopt a more balanced or objective perspective. In contrast, by taking the perspective of a compassionate other towards oneself, “mental space” is provided to recognize the broader human context of one’s experience and to put things in greater perspective. (“Yes it is very difficult what I’m going through right now, but there are many other people who are experiencing much greater suffering.  Perhaps this isn’t worth getting quite so upset about…”)

    Related article:
     Does Self-Compassion Mean Letting Yourself Off the Hook?

    Self-Compassion is not self-indulgence.

    Self-compassion is also very different from self-indulgence. Many people say they are reluctant to be self-compassionate because they’re afraid they would let themselves get away with anything.  “I’m stressed out today so to be kind to myself I’ll just watch TV all day and eat a quart of icecream.” This, however, is self-indulgence rather than self-compassion.  Remember that being compassionate to oneself means that you want to be happy and healthy in the long term. In many cases, just giving oneself pleasure may harm well-being (such as taking drugs, over-eating, being a couch potato), while giving yourself health and lasting happiness often involves a certain amount of displeasure (such as quitting smoking, losing weight, exercising).  People are often very hard on themselves when they notice something they want to change because they think they can shame themselves into action – the self-flagellation approach.  However, this approach often backfires if you can’t face difficult truths about yourself because you are so afraid of hating yourself if you do.  Thus, weaknesses may remain unacknowledged in an unconscious attempt to avoid self-censure. In contrast, the care intrinsic to compassion provides a powerful motivating force for growth and change, while also providing the safety needed to see the self clearly without fear of self-condemnation.

     Related article: Is it Self-Indulgent to Be Self-Compassionate?

     

     

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  2. Welcome, Sheililly! 

    Our community is a safe space for support, connection and inspiration to help you be more mindful in your daily life.

    Please feel free to 

    - download and rate some free audio meditations

    - or let us know how we can support your practice.

    Wherever you are with your mindfulness journey, you are most welcome here! 

    With gratitude,

    Sean Fargo

    Founder, Mindfulness Exercises

  3. Hi Matt! Welcome to our community!

    Thank you for your great work with the Pathways program!

    I am actually in the process of creating a way for us to sit together mindfully via Zoom. I'll share the details with you soon. 🙂

     

    In the meantime, our community here is a safe space for support, connection and inspiration to help you be more mindful in your daily life.

    We would love it if you

    - join and participate in a mindfulness Club

    - comment about mindfulness in daily life

    - or let us know how we can support your practice.

    Wherever you are with your mindfulness journey, you are most welcome here! 

    With gratitude,

    Sean Fargo

    Founder, Mindfulness Exercises

  4. On 10/1/2019 at 10:43 AM, Julie Bloom said:

    I recently lost my father to cancer. He lived a very beautiful and rich life until the age of 80, and he was a true blessing and gift to his family and friends. As you said, it's never easy, even though we knew the time would come, and had a few months to prepare. when the day came, it was surreal. Through mindfulness, what I've learned is to sit with sadness and allow it to show up in the body, and then focus on the area that feels heavy or in pain and then simply breathe into the area. The goal is to allow the sadness to be, acknowledge where it shows up in the body, and then sit with it until the energy moves through that area, as to not feel any more pain in the particular area that you observed. Letting go of the energy allows us to release some sadness as it arises.

    Beautifully said, Julie. 

    This reminds me of what the West African healer Sobonfu Some writes here:

    http://www.sobonfu.com/articles/writings-by-sobonfu-2/embracing-grief/

    • Like 2
  5. Wow! Welcome, Mafalda! I look forward to exploring your work.

    What kinds of social responsibility activities do you develop? 

    Out of curiosity, could you share what lead you to fall in love with mind potential in 2008? 

    Looking forward to being a part of this community with you,

    Sean

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