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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/28/2020 in all areas

  1. Thank you, I am glad you appreciated this video. I am participating in Path to Freedom, to bring mindfulness teaching to prisoners. I believe it can make such a difference, and that is has been such a disservice to prisoners that they have not been exposed to rehabilitative programs such as this. I also plan to teach yoga in women's prisons. Best, Jo
    7 points
  2. 6 points
  3. @Jo L - I'm re-sharing the video you posted in a thread because it will probably be easier for people to find here than on your profile page. Thank you so much for sharing this - what a beautiful reminder of our oneness.
    5 points
  4. Thank you for the open and honest sharing @MariaDe. First, let me just say that it is wonderful you notice this tendency within yourself. It is easy to simply act out on these feelings without reflecting on them; it takes courage to acknowledge these sorts of things and begin to address them honestly. I don't know how much advice I can give, but one thing I will say is that for me, it is has been helpful to make friends with my aloneness - my fears of being alone, my fears of being abandoned, etc. This has involved quieting the mind and just allowing myself to feel the somatic experience
    4 points
  5. There was a quote from John Kabatt-Zinn on Day 70 of Mindfulness Exercises. He said that while mindfulness is said to be at the "heart of Buddhism" it is not about Buddhism but simply about concentration. However, there is a real danger in divorcing the two. Mindfulness is being used, reportedly, to improve the ability of sharpshooters to kill their "targets" by armed forces. I realize those targets are probably trying to kill those who shoot to kill them. Somehow, there is still a violation of anything Buddha would ever have wanted for Mindfulness to help with by this type of use. If it is on
    4 points
  6. With 58% of vertebrae species, 80% of freshwater fish, 40% of the global insect population (76% in some regions), and 90% of ocean biomass having extincted just since 1970, ... and with 70-90% of remaining species projected to extinct by the end of this century (at current rate of extinction, not factoring in acceleration), ... and with cognitive ability and average IQ scores plummeting (7 points since 1970) and dementia now the fifth leading cause of human death, ... and with human sperm viability declining 53% since 1970, ... and with climate chaos and a ‘baked in’ 3-5 C
    4 points
  7. 4 points
  8. As I've been watching the news and scrolling through social media over the past couple of months, I've noticed certain divides expanding: the divide between the right and the left, between lockdown advocates and lockdown protesters, between those that follow mainstream news and those that follow alternative news sources. So I am wondering if we can discuss how mindfulness might help us to soften these perceived gaps. While yes, it is apparent there is a gap between certain viewpoints, can we focus on what actually unites us? I know there is also a growing sense of community and support in
    4 points
  9. Very appropriate topic and excellent quote Gillian. I feel both more vulnerable and more empowered. Staying at home with my husband and not working makes me feel vulnerable: I'm not making money, I'm not being a psychologist and helping people (which I'm realizing was a role I was too attached to and defined myself by), I'm having to sit still with myself, and I'm having to spend more quiet time with my husband. In addition, I worried about the coronavirus, not so much for myself, but for my family and for all of those who have been infected and their families. I decided to take advantage of
    4 points
  10. This is a major point of The Body Keeps the Score. A few days ago I heard The Dhamma teacher Dawn Neal tell the story of her little niece being angry, pounding her fists on Dawn's thighs which were as high as the little girl could reach, and yelling in anger, "I hate you, I hate you, I hate you." Dawn looked down and said, "I love you." Her niece stopped yelling and hugged her. The lesson had to do with people needing to be seen and heard, precisely the point of The Body Keeps the Score and, if I understand correctly, Shaun's teachings on "reciprocity." We tend to do all sorts of things to "fi
    4 points
  11. Thanks Gillian! When I worked with clients and taught meditation, I always explained in detail what meditation was before beginning the process, since many were scared of anything new, particularly anything having to do with relaxation. Also, I always reminded them that they were free to keep their eyes open, which many people did, at least at first. I found that asking people to focus on their breath often backfired, since traumatized individuals typically breathe shallowly and can get caught up in doing it "right." So, I usually begin with a body scan. However, I don't do a full b
    4 points
  12. That must have been quite tough @Gene Williams. That would of course shift and influence your journey related to expressing yourself. My environment was always very physically safe growing up but spiritually and emotionally it was constricting. As I moved through my teenage years and into adult life, I still held on to a lot of the 'good girl' conditioning that made me feel 'wrong' or 'bad' for expressing my feelings and needs (and to some degree, still do). So for me, learning to speak up in my teenage and early adulthood years was never in opposition with my physical wellbeing - a situa
    4 points
  13. I'm going to quote my favorite Sufi poet Rumi: "What you are seeking, is seeking you." "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I'll meet you there." I believe the key to mindfulness is being gentle with yourself and not having expectations. Allowing whatever happens to happen. Continuing to come back to your breath, believing that breath is all-sustaining, and understanding the miracle of breath- that we breathe without effort, that the universe wants us to live even if we don't want to. The evidence is simple- try to hold your breath. You simply can't, your bod
    4 points
  14. I began a page called Journey 2 Joy "52 Weeks Challenge of Gratitude" Each week follow and post on that page.
    4 points
  15. I wasn't sure which category to post this in, and choose trauma since it relates to disassociation, which I know can be a pitfall of certain mindfulness teachings. I want to bring up the topic of how becoming a "passive observer" of one's life and oneself can lead to constant self-monitoring, disconnection and withdrawl, and the question of how to avoid this, mitigate this? Running a google search will bring up countless accounts of those who have been harmed by mindfulness (in my opinion, by the way mindfulness was presented to them) in serious ways, such as disassociation, depersonalization,
    4 points
  16. I think this is an important topic as well. As a psychologist, I specialized in working with individuals with trauma, and many were on the spectrum of dissociative disorders. I learned various grounding techniques when I saw that they were dissociating, such as asking them to name 5 things they saw, 3 scents in the air, 5 sounds they could hear, the taste in their mouth, 3 things they could feel, and getting them in their body. I did use mindfulness with these clients, but was very aware of their body language and level of awareness. Some people with dissociative identity disorder can benefit
    4 points
  17. I have taught in business settings. Usually to people with high pressure jobs and a lot on their plate. I have focused on teaching them that Mindful singletasking is actually much more efficient than "multitasking" which is really just task switching. I also put a lot of emphasis on making sure that all of the Doing that has to happen throughout the day is Mindfully rooted in Being.
    4 points
  18. Hi! I am focusing on taking care of my whole self by starting every day with prayer, tea, and gratitude. I’m staying off anything electronic during my first and last 1 1/2 hours of each day.
    4 points
  19. My go to is the Wayne Dyer, and through Chinese medicine with the Buddha brought me to mindfulness also. The Dalai Lama book, "The Art of Happiness" spoke much of mindfulness. Various other influencers along the way.
    4 points
  20. Great idea! As a kid, I wanted to be like Indiana Jones. In my 20's, I wanted to be like Yoda. Now I want to be like both.
    4 points
  21. A bit about me? Great-Grandma - Fairy Garden Caretaker - StarGazer - GhostBuster - Bean Counter - Mystic - Ordained Minister
    3 points
  22. I had a tough experience in the last few years with an autocratic person. I was a leader in a program and that person led another. When my group and I advocated for a change to a topic that involved both groups, that person went wild. That person communicated in a way that was dehumanzing. After my last enconter I was literally in a state of shock.That person organized an attempt to turn a common community against us. It ended in a stalemate. I resigned to recuperate from the withering attacks. Then, a new leader from our group and other new members attempted interaction again. Same wild and
    3 points
  23. If I don’t feel like meditating, before simply giving in I try to examine what is going on that has given rise to an aversion to meditating. Often that settles me right down, but if it doesn’t the next step for me is evaluating my affordable energy. If my tank is empty, then maybe I need sleep or a refreshing exercise. If I’m too agitated, I do some walking meditation or Tai Chi first. If aversion about something else seems to be the problem, then I meditate but start with practices to generate kindness and compassion. It usually makes being with aversion simply part of being what we are that
    3 points
  24. “What do you do when you don't feel like meditating?” Then I don’t.
    3 points
  25. Thank you @Jeff Miller, @Rachel, and @Daniel A. Detwiler for your thoughtful words and reflections. I resonate with much of what has been shared here and I am very grateful for your contributions to this community. It has taken me a few days to get to the computer to share my thoughts. So here are my own answers to this week's questions... 1. One significant lesson I learned in a deeper way this year is that it is much easier to cast judgment than to look at where what we judge exists within us. Despite the former of the two being easier, this is not the path towards peace and conten
    3 points
  26. hello mindfulness exercises community- this afternoon, i was sitting at my kitchen table (aka my desk now), watching the first snow flurries of the season here on the east coast and plugging along through my day. during a break, i glanced at my phone, and noticed i had an audio message from a local, though unknown number. when i listened, a flood of warmth and gratitude washed through me. it was from a mother of a former student...from 20 years ago! her daughter is now 27 and living in paris. her message was one of sheer appreciation- 'i was reflecting on the wonderful teacher a
    3 points
  27. I write up my day 14 challenge my areas of my life where I can be more forgiving are at my aunt's house also at my parents house even my apartment and my fiance's apartment. When am talking to my people any where in my life and I will be forgiving myself without judgement. I'm showing compassion to my co-worker boss and my best friends also two of my families even my fiance. Am being kind to one friend of mine and I'm not ready to show compassion right now because she doesn't do that to me and I don't see her that much because she lives out of state but me and her are staying c
    3 points
  28. I am noticing my own resistance to the way things are, and releasing the resistance. I am settling into the earth and breath and open heart. I am walking and connecting to what is most important to me. I know what I pay attention to grows. Then I am allowing some short period to see the election results. I am listening to my friends who have opposing views with more depth and understanding, because I am so confused by how people can listen to lack of integrity. The sun is shining this morning and the temperature in Vermont is beautiful today. Peace Peace Peace xoxo Jen
    3 points
  29. I was really stressed and depressed Wed. morning as i feared the same outcome as last time even though I know the final count would not be in. I did feel better after going out for my walk. I am an online activist so I get a lot pf mail too much of it political since that man took the WH and I deleted ever one, every bit of news, did not turn on the radio and when in the car I put in CD's. It lessened my stress considerably. I got a few snatches but i do not pay attention i might see although i was boosted by some that I saw. the tension is there but i try to keep it in the back of my mind.
    3 points
  30. Hello, everyone- I hope that this message finds you all healthy, safe, and well. I am excited to share that I was invited by a municipal office in the large city where I live to lead a live (virtual) mindfulness meditation to the stretched thin staff as well as their teen interns. It was a wonderful experience! I received such positive feedback from the group, and I have been invited back to open their monthly staff meetings with a moment of mindfulness! Thanks to all for the ongoing support! Be well- Rachel
    3 points
  31. Thanks, WBA, I was going to contribute a slightly different way of belittling myself, judging myself deficient. But, I don’t think the particular flavors matter. I do think it is good to have realistic ideas of our limitations, but that is different from letting judgments of them define and limit us. Maybe it can help us take appropriate steps to create conditions more conducive to success when we “go for it?”
    3 points
  32. I have recently learned that empathy is the identifying with the feelings of others, while compassion is being called to help. This has helped me reframe compassion for both myself and for others. Viewing compassion as something actionable has made it more concrete for me. I, like @Gillian Sanger am regularly drawn to metta and tonglen styles of meditation. In both, the concepts of helping, wishing, meditating in the interest of increasing the well being of others is, to me, the action of compassion. I also really like the self-compassion work of Kristin Neff, who taught me about the
    3 points
  33. I’m David, now living in Utah. I was an attorney in public service, sometimes supporting the activities of government agencies and sometimes serving as a prosecutor. I would not say that I found my work unsatisfying, but I would say I never felt like it was totally aligned with my deepest values. My introduction to the teachings attributed to the Buddha about 14 years ago really struck a chord in me and I have been pursuing my interest in them and formal meditation practice vigorously ever since. I have organized a small meditation group through a local community center and participate in seve
    3 points
  34. lol...yes we humans do have a propensity to want to control our breath - and you are absolutely right - the moment we relinquish that control aspect, and observe - the breath becomes a friend - when i teach, i always recommend for one to give the breath a color - and that helps one visualize the breath going in and out of the body - with the added bonus of caressing the internal organs and healing them... the traditional method is to visualize the breath as a golden or a white color - but one can play with it and explore that visualization with different colours - there's more to the breath me
    3 points
  35. My yoga teacher Tara Cindy Sherman said: Speak your truth, even if your voice shakes
    3 points
  36. https://maps.org/news/multimedia-library/3012-how-psychedelic-drugs-can-help-patients-face-death Hello David, There is some interesting research about psychedelics helping patients decrease anxiety before death. I don't have netflix unfortunately, otherwise I wold definitely look into The Midnight Gospel. I've read that the theory about why it helps is that the illusion of the boundary that separates us from all other beings and the world itself dissolves during the use of the psychedelics, which makes the idea of death less frightening since there is a feeling of oneness with
    3 points
  37. Hello @Ali Zien, This sounds like it was a powerful experience for you. I think you need to give yourself credit for recognizing, in the moment, that you were experiencing suffering and you became aware of these feelings in the moment. I can't say that this mental suffering really goes away. I am learning that the state of suffering is a part of life and for me, the best way to cope is to accept that it is there. Tara Brach talks about just accepting and allowing the experience to be there. I highly recommend reading "Radical Acceptance". We have started a book club on this site if
    3 points
  38. I am a primary care physician and trained MBSR teacher . I also did trainings with Dr rick Hanson and positive neuroplasticity and i am now doing some polyvagal theory webinars with deb dana . The stress in the surgery for the patients and staff is massive at the moment and my trainings are really helping me and the patients . id love to hear how others mix the two areas . i teach mindfulness and mediation classes outside of my day job . currently doing it on line . its working well . Im teaching outside my day job as a dr as mindfulnessyourway.ie
    3 points
  39. Hello @Gillian Sanger, @David Weiskopfand @Jo L, This is a complicated question without an easy answer. I can't add anything substantial to what has already been said. Yes, we do have to understand other perspectives and be able to hold competing perspectives, without judgement. Being mindful of our needs and the needs of others is a pathway to finding common ground. I am a little familiar with Dr. Marshall Rosenberg's work and believe that we all have basic needs and much conflict is caused because competing individual’s and groups have different methods and approaches to meet those need
    3 points
  40. 3 points
  41. I like to remember the kindness of others as part of a meditation before I go to sleep
    3 points
  42. Happy Earth Day to all...and especially to Mama Gaia. May we walk lightly upon her. I am new to the community and am so grateful to be here. For me, this pandemic and the sheltering in place has given me pause...literally and figuratively. I am someone who usually is on 'go' most of the day (save for my sacred early morning meditation and exercise). I am a single mom, with a demanding career in urban education, and in the usual day to day, time seems to fly by without many moments for reflection. Since I now am teaching remotely, as well as homeschooling my two kids, the days are
    3 points
  43. Hello! My name is Stephanie Jackson. I am in the process of developing a consistent routine that incorporates both mindfulness and meditation to help me navigate my day to be more positive and productive.
    3 points
  44. It was great to stumble on this group, looking forward to hanging out, learning and sharing.
    3 points
  45. Hello @Gillian Sanger and @Paige PIlege, I have worked in the health and social services field for over 30 years in various positions. I have experienced moments when I changed my experience by seeking out new employment and shifting my perspective about work. I think that there were also instances where I stayed too long in a job and put too much emphasis on shifting my perspective. But my strategy was positive thinking rather than mindfulness of what I was experiencing. I did learn a lot about the benefits of seeing the positive in situations. However, I was not doing this in the conte
    3 points
  46. Hey Gillian, I really appreciate what you have shared here. I too am thankful for the opportunity I have now to slow down, and breathe, reflect, and become aware of where I am in this moment. I remember a teacher of mine who was showing walking meditation sharing that the practice of walking meditation reminds us of the miracle of balance. Our bodies know what to do and we just do it. Each step then becomes an appreciation for our bodies and a reminder that our health is something to appreciate and nurture. The absence of close connection with some friends right now is a reminder of how much I
    3 points
  47. I think I mentally go down a rabbithole sometimes with things like witnessing the witnessing and overcomplicating it all. I also find myself thinking about mindfulness and questioning whether I'm being mindful in the moment and then of course that can keep me stuck in my thoughts too. I really resonate with mindfulness not being just internal - being mindful of the outside world, sort of like an outwardly turned mindfulness rather than turning our attention back into ourselves all of the time. I do find when trying to listen mindfully how often I am focused on my own thoughts, and
    3 points

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